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Ep# 6 – This Is Yu – Family Food Flashback

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Transcript of this Ep 6 – A little further down the page.

In this Ep 6 – This Is Yu Podcast, find out what a Scoville Heat Unit is??? And how to show off at a party with your new found knowledge. 

Also we talk about a new community we have started. This Is Yu VIP Community. Plus we want your questions. Call us at 562.291.6037 and leave a voice message with your questions. 

We become overwhelmed by weird sensations as we find ourselves falling into a Family Food Flashback! And yes it’s different then falling into a food coma 😉

A brand new section we are super excited to share –  we call it: Minutiae. Interesting information on a subject – in this case Hot Peppers, that will in no way help you in life, unless, you find yourself on a gameshow and the topic is Hot Peppers – then you will slay!!!

This week’s Life Hack helps your Instagram account shine!!! Moving from AUTO MODE to MANUAL MODE can be a little scary. Listen for the benefits as we encourage you to play!!!

Home base for us is www.ThisIsYu.com
Instagram @ThisIsYuOfficial
Search This Is Yu VIP on Facebook

Please comment, rate, and subscribe to our This Is Yu Podcast.

We appreciate you listening!

Scott & Carole

Begin Ep#6 – This Is Yu – Family Food Flashback

Carole

Welcome to Episode 6 of This is Yu. I am Carole Yu 

Scott

And I’m Scott Stewart.

Carole

Today we’re going to talk about some new ways that you can get in touch with us and answer the world’s questions. Also family food flashback. Say that fast five times and we’re gonna talk about

Scott

You can’t even say it once fast.

Carole

I know for the family family food flashback. Minutia. And what’s that, Scott?

Scott

We’ve got a photography pro tip for you photographers out there looking to make a great picture.

Carole

Scott, why don’t you tell us what our new creative fun ways are for our community? To get in touch with us!

Scott

We have started on Facebook, ladies and gentlemen. Something called This is Yu V. I. P. Community. It’s a Facebook group where people share their journeys, their highs, their lows, their victories, their struggles, their obstacles and we share ours. We just started it. So you guys will be in on the ground floor. So we highly recommend you get in there. You can ask questions. You can share your victories, your stories. All you need to do is go to Facebook dot com and search. This Is Yu. V I P. YU is spelled… Y U.

Carole

Then we have a second way because we really want to hear from you personally. And we want to really know your voices. So we have started a This Is Yu hotline for you guys to call in and leave a voicemail with any of your questions. The number is 562 291-6037 and again, 562 291-6037.  

Scott

Excellent. Excellent. Wow, what has happened? Really weird, man. What about you, Carole? Can you feel I can I can Oh, my God. I feel like we’re falling into a FAMILY FOOD FLASHBACK! This so weird there is shag carpet everywhere and everything is colored either, brown, orange…

Carole

red. Look at that. Oh, my gosh. There’s a van over there. What is that? 

Scott

Yeah, that’s the Shaggin Wagon. Okay, hang on.

Carole

What?

Scott

Just let me read this little plaque under here. What does this say? Don’t bother knockin if you see this van a ROCKIN. Wow. So we flashed back. Carole this is crazy. And you know, now that we’re here, I’m having all these sort of memories of what it was like and the food I ate when I was back in this time, I mean for me. I grew up on peanut butter and jam. If you ask any of my friends how I got to this point in my life, they would say I was propelled 24 7 by peanut butter and jam. I loved peanut butter and jam, and it wasn’t even good peanut butter and jam. It was that bulk stuff that your dad would go out and buy because he was looking to save some money and we would put it on white white bread because we were super white in the super white neighborhood. I can remember I would eat so much peanut butter and jam. I would have it multiple times a day. Then I would go to sleep and wake up about one o’clock in the morning, and I was so tired, I could hardly keep my eyes open. But I would shuffle into the kitchen and make myself a peanut butter and jam sandwich. And then I would just leave everything out, eat it all and go to bed.

Carole

Well, you know what? I also have a peanut butter memory because my sisters and I, for some reason I got into a really strange habit of just eating peanut butter on a spoon. So whenever we would don’t wanna have a snack and you wanted something kind of that could stick your tongue to the top of your mouth. Peanut butter. There you go. And have you ever seen when we’ve given it to Mo our dog?

Scott

That’s Ah, that’s a good Friday night right there. Three or four hours. Just watching him ( Dog licking peanut butter sounds ).

Carole

But you know what? I would also sometimes add honey, so I would do peanut butter and honey. Sometimes I do peanut butter and syrup. Anything to give it a little bit of a twist. You ever do that?

Scott

Yeah, actually, uh, peanut butter and jam was not 100% percent all the time. I did get into peanut butter and honey, and I found I liked this stuff. I don’t know what you call it. There’s a liquid honey, And then there’s also sort of the hard honey where you’d pop the top off. And if you took your knife and used it as a murder weapon and just jammed it into the honey multiple times, it would soften up. And I used to love taking that in big hunks of it and put it on my peanut butter sandwich.

Carole

So you’re saying that your house was, like, 30 degrees, so your honey actually crystallized?

Scott

Oh, yeah. My dad was looking to save money anywhere he could. It was cold in there. And then the other thing I used to do I just remember this was I used to put a ton of butter on my peanut butter and jam. And even if I go into Starbucks now and tell them, Hey, can I get peanut butter and butter and jam on that bagel? They’ll look at me cross eyed, and I rarely get it that way.

Carole

I remember when we first met and you asked me to go get a bagel, as you say, a bagel at Noah’s bagels. You would tell me to put butter and peanut butter, and I just thought, Oh, that’s really weird. Anyway, these are, all memories that bring back good times when we were Children, it helps us to reminisce about the comfort food that we have our parents, our relationships. It brings back something that makes our hearts feel warm. So another one that I thought off because now that we’re talking about white food, as you said cause you were white, white, I grew up in an Asian family. My parents are both Chinese, so we had both Asian food. And because my parents were raised in New Zealand, we also had white food and we had New Zealand food. So one of the ones that we had that was kind of a white food is American cheese. So American cheese was something that my sisters I have two younger sisters and I love to eat on Saturday mornings, so I would love to unwrap that piece of American cheese. Pull that plastic off. I always thought it was kind of interesting. I love the way that it was. Ah, the paper. The plastic was

Scott

Hang on. Sorry. Can I interrupt there for a second? When you’re eating that cheese, you’re supposed to take off the plastic???

Carole

Yeah, but I love that. I love taking off the plastic and the fact that it was sealed along the edges and it was open in the middle and you could peel it. I love doing that. And then I would take the cheese out and I would put it on one hand, and then I would fold it into tiny little pieces. I’d fold it in half fold it in half again. I think I would maybe get 16 pieces out of a little piece of American cheese, and what I would do is I was sit and watch our Saturday morning cartoons, and my sister, Frances, says she has the same memory. She would do the same thing, and we would sit there with our stack of 16 tiny pieces of American cheese, and we would pop them in our mouths as we were watching Bugs Bunny and Porky Pig.

Scott

Speaking of dairy in our household, my dad couldn’t keep up with milk production. We could have had probably 10 cows in the backyard. We drank so much milk, I drank gallons and gallons of milk. I remember constantly walking now to Beckers and getting the gallon jug of milk and bringing it home as a little kid, and your arm was always, like one inch longer on this side and carry the milk, then eventually, just because the cost of my dad being Scottish and wanting to cut back costs. He switched over to powdered milk. It was a box with a plastic bag filled up with I guess some sort of dried milk and looked like detergent detergent we used to use to clean oil stains out of our jeans and as a breakfast beverage. But anyway, so you put some. I can’t remember the ratio of it, but you’d put some in a glass, mixed some water in it, and it tastes like white milky water.

Carole

We never had that. But we did drink a lot of milk too. That was also the drink that we would have a lot especially. I played a lot of tennis when I was growing up, and for some reason I’d come home from tennis practice and drink a giant glass of milk. Mmm mmm, mmm mmm. And now it’s ironic because I can’t even drink milk nowadays, so I don’t know how I did it then, but now I just drink almond milk. 

Scott

When I was drinking all that milk, I also ate a ton of cereal, so I’d have big glasses of milk all day long and then in the morning, actually, pretty much all the time, I would have cereal. My favorite cereals at the time were Lucky Charms. I love them because they’re magically delicious. I’ll, make a bridge and run away. So it started out having Lucky Charms in the morning before school. And then when I was a teenager, we used to go roller skating. We would come home at, like, two o’clock in the morning. My friend Gordon I he would come over and we would sit down in the kitchen and on a Saturday night, my dad had just gone shopping during the day and we would polish off a bowl of Lucky Charms together. Like we would sit there with a bowl each milk and just eat the whole box in one seating. And that’d be like a Gord I don’t feel so good. I go to bed. Yeah, yeah, me too, I’ll talk to tomorrow. And then the other cereal that we had was Captain Crunch and I had a love hate relationship with Captain Crunch because whenever I ate it, it always tore up the roof of my mouth. I always had these little dangly pieces of skin hanging from the roof of my mouth and it was that damn Captain Crunch!!! Also, the weird thing to me was Captain Crunch left like a film on your teeth. I’m sure was some sort of a weird chemical film. I don’t know if it exists now, because I don’t eat Captain Crunch. Now, you could tell if I had eaten a box of Captain Crunch on the roof of my mouth. These little tiny Stalactites and Stalagmites hanging down from the roof of my mouth.

Carole

You know what I remember now that I loved going on airplanes? Because if you went on an overnight airplane International, they would give you those little boxes and how they had the perforations on those boxes in the shape of, like, a letter h and you would open it up and you’re supposed to pour the milk into the wax paper with the cereal.

Scott

Yeah, it was awesome eating, eating a self contained cereal box. I love that. And it was always you got a whole pick – we had Fruit Loops to was another big one. Now I’m starting to notice a trend with my food habits as a child. And I think what it was was sugar because I’m just flashing back now to in the wintertime we used to eat this serial was Cream of Wheat, and it was just like little tiny pieces of cracked wheat or something. And it was like porridge or oatmeal, and you would boil it in hot water and leave it in there. I don’t know, five minutes on high, and then it would cook down, cooked down, and you could make it into this sort of mushy stuff and once again put a bunch of milk on it. But the key component with this that made it totally edible and totally lovable was brown sugar. We bought the big  5lb bags of brown sugar, and I would just scoop it on there. There’s no parental supervision at this point, so it was like we were up early in the morning and just scooping, scooping brown sugar all over it. So much so that when I finished my Cream of Wheat at the bottom, I could just scoop up full spoon loads of sugar, and I ate it. So for like the next hour until I started to crash was like, blah blah blah

Carole

Well, you know, we had cereal also for breakfast. So my dad would take care of us for breakfast and we would have a bowl of cereal or we would have some oatmeal. And we would also have one of those tiny, tiny, little four ounce glasses of orange juice. Do you remember this? Like, for some reason, orange juice was rationed back in the 70. 

Scott

It was like the war, but with orange juice.

Carole

I know. So we’d have these. We had these really nice glasses. I remember them. They were hexagonal and they were about maybe three inches high. And you’d have two inches of orange juice. And that was the only orange juice if we were allowed and then we’d have a bowl of cereal with milk. And then I think maybe my dad would give us three pieces from half apple, and that would be our cereal. I mean, that would be our cereal on our apple and orange juice, and we’d be off to school.

Scott

Yeah, with regards to orange juice, I transitioned away from milk. I got into orange juice and I loved orange juice. I would just drink glasses and glasses of the stuff all day long.

Carole

Okay, so Let me ask you a question. What kind of orange juice did you like? Pulp? Heavy poop? Yeah,

Scott

I liked it with the poop in it. That was a favorite because it’s chewy and get peanut stuff in. 

Carole

Pulp or no pulp?

Scott

 I didn’t really care as long as had the word orange juice on the front cover. I would drink big giant glasses of orange juice all day long. I loved loved, loved orange juice, and I used to eat it with stacks of cookies chocolate chip cookies. So my regular come home meal every day from school was a stack of chocolate chip cookies and orange juice. In our household. I don’t know what it was with my dad at that point, but you could just drink as much orange juices as you wanted. I mean, we were growing boys. There’s three of us growing then, so we just pounded through all of this stuff. But as Carole said, I would have sleepovers at other guys, places on the hockey team, and I remember going over to this one family, and once again, you know, it would be Saturday morning. They’d be making up pancakes. Hey, do you want a whole bunch of pancakes and you could eat as many pancakes as you want. And the only beverage you had was this little four ounce glass of orange juice. And I’m like, looking around at everyone else, and everyone would just sort of be sipping it. And I just chugged it in a second uh, yeah, can I have more more orange juice, please?

Carole

 You know, I remember one story about orange juice because our family had the super pulp orange juice, So it was thick. Basically, you were drinking orange juice is, though it were syrup. So I used to when we were growing up, go to Chinese family camp because I grew up in Indiana and there were hardly any Asian families there. So my parents and the other parents all wanted to get us kids together so we would have camp during the summer, and then we would have reunions in around Christmas or some time in the holidays, and one time we went over to Carl Chow’s house and we had okay, remember, I’m drinking orange juice, the thickness off maple syrup, and one time we’ve been over to Carl Chow’s house and the orange juice was probably one part orange juice, three parts water. I think it was like, What is that stuff that yet that orange stuff When you were growing up, that was like Tang Tang. That’s it, That’s it. You drink that. So you would. So it tasted to me something like Tang like it just didn’t have much taste to it. It had a little little, little, tiny taste of orange juice. 

Scott

Keeping in line with all the milk that I drank at the time. The other thing I did was eat a ton of ice cream. My dad would shop and he would buy Neapolitan ice cream. Neapolitan ice cream was chocolate, vanilla and strawberry, and it came in these 45 gallon drums that we kept out in the backyard and you would go out there and you would just get a bucket load of this stuff and sit in front of the TV and eat it and eat it and eat it. And I ate so much of this stuff that I would have these weird kind of stomach things where I would kind of regurgitate some of it. It was almost like throwing up a little bit. I know it’s kind of sick, but yeah, maybe a little bit too much ice cream in my history there.

Carole

Another thing that we would have cause we’re still concentrating on white people food, is every birthday. My mom would make Jell O molds for us, and we would have orange or red or green Jell O molds that she would make in a It would look like it was. It wasn’t silicone because they didn’t have a back then, but it was like a plastic mold that had a lid on it. It looked like a bundt pan, and she was put the Jell O in it. And then for every birthday, she would unmold it with, like a pop. I don’t know how to make that sound, but anyway, you know what I mean. 

Scott

We’ll add that in later with sound effects.

Carole

Put the Jell O in it. And then for every birthday she would unmold it with, like, a ( slimy kiss sound effect ) And we would have that for our birthday parties, along with cake and all the other kinds of things. So how about you, Scott? Did you Did you guys ever have Jell O.

Scott

My mom would make us jello when we were sick. It was the best thing I love.

Carole

Oh, yeah,

Scott

I loved getting sick. It was the best time because we got red Jello. I love Red Jello was kind of my number one go to Then she also made orange and I think green. But along the same lines of what you were saying is there must have been something in Good Housekeeping magazine because my mother also did make an exact replica of what you’re saying. I remember it being like green Jell O used to put coleslaw on it. So it was crunchy!

Carole

Eww… what?

Scott

It would be like a picnic-y kind of thing. You’d go somewhere over to Milnes’ Dam

Carole

Eww…

Scott

Something like that. Bust out the Jell O and there would be like the Jell O would be like crunch, crunch, crunch

Carole

Inside, the Jell O?

Scott

Inside the Jell O. It was kind of weird, but it had Jell O. So you were still madly in love with it!

Carole

Along with the fact that we had white people’s food. We also had Asian food. One of the things my mom made all the time every time we had guests over. My father was the chairman of the mathematics department at Notre Dame several times when I was growing up so they would have maybe 30 faculty over for dinner every semester or so. And my mom taught Chinese cooking when I was growing up so she would make a big, maybe five or six course meal for all of these faculty members and their wives. And I remember every single time she would make pickled cucumbers. That’s one of my favorite dishes from my mother’s recipes because it’s something that was so familiar with. It brings back a lot of memories, and my sisters and I, we all love making it. It’s a really easy recipe, and I’m going to put it. We are going to put it on the blog and I’ll have the recipe, and I will show you the specific way that my mother cut the pickles and made it really beautiful. Next, we would have fried rice. Fried rice was once a week. It was taking the leftovers from whatever other meals my mom had made that week, and then we have rice left over because we had rice every single dinner and then we just throw everything else in the rice. There was also a dish called Bak Jam Gai, which is white cut chicken. Basically, it’s a steamed chicken, the chicken super tender, and it has when you leave it in the refrigerator. It has a clear gel that you eat, and it was so delicious. Nowadays, people also know this as Hainan chicken. We also had deep fried wontons with apricot sauce, so my mom would make these. Yep, she would make these wontons whenever someone was sick or we wanted to give people food. She would always make these deep fried wontons, and she’d have a base of pork, water chestnuts and ginger and garlic, and they were really delicious. And it was always fun to deep fry these wontons and put them out onto the paper towels to dry. And the last thing, which you can also see in a video on our website, are egg crepes that are stuffed with a fish pace. If you look under videos on our website, ThiIsYu.com. You can see the egg crepe stuffed with fish paste, so those are some of the Asian food memories that we have. Scott. Did your family ever eat Asian food?

Scott

We did eat Asian food all the time. We went to this place called Red Rose Garden. There was a guy in my math class called Perry Sido and his family owned this Chinese food restaurant called Red Rose. And we used to go in there and get Chinese food all the time. And we loved, loved, loved it. Probably a little different than what your family ate. But that was our Asian food.

Carole

The last thing I want to talk about that helps me reminisce about my childhood is my exposure to New Zealand food. So my parents both grew up in New Zealand. My mother really loves to make a Pavlova, and it has to have the ah whipped cream, the Passion fruit and the Kiwi fruit. And she uses the Edmonds recipe so you can look online for Edmund’s Pavlova recipe. 

Scott

I want to talk about like a typical let’s say, the big dinner of the week was our Sunday night meal. My mom would make a whole bunch of different types of meals, but because I’m from a really super white bread family. There was no spice. There was no variation in it, in the sense that spicy food for us was a little bit of extra pepper in it. But she used to make this Shepherd’s Pie, and I loved, loved, loved the Shepherd’s Pie, especially in the winter time. It was so freezing cold. We played so much hockey, so we’d be outside or we’d be going to public skating or we’d be having hockey games or practices. So we’re always in cold arenas, and coming home for that dinner on a Sunday night was awesome because we had this Shepherd’s Pie.

Carole

So what is Shepherd’s Pie? Because we never had it. I didn’t grow up with it. How did your mom make? 

Scott

Really? Your Asian family didn’t grow up with Shepherd’s Pie. Wow, that’s so weird. Yeah, Shepherd’s Pie is from Great Britain, so I think England has their version of it. Ireland, probably Scotland, Wales all have different variations of it, but basically, to me, it’s like good, hearty peasant food. I’m just going from my memory here. I don’t know if this is the exact recipe of what she did. Everything was cooked in a 9 by 12 glass dish. The Shepherd’s Pie was no exception. You could make it with lamb, ground up lamb or ground up beef, and then there would be onion in it. I remember some potatoes, some corn. There would be carrots and peas, and then there’d be a little bit of salt. And if you want it, it’s spicy. A little bit of pepper, and she would cook it all off. There would be some sort of a broth in it. You can make it with red wine. I think she was just drinking the red wine. She didn’t want to waste it inside the Shepherd’s Pie, and then it would boil all down. It would simmer for a while. Then you would put it in the 9 by 12 dish than you would mash up potatoes, put a ton of butter in an a ton of salt, and then you would pretend you were like in grade 7 art class, you have the 9 by 12 glass dish. Then you put the meat portion in the bottom of the dish. Then you would take your mashed potato with a spatula and just cream it all on top all the way over to the edges. Then it would go into the oven for a set amount of time and out it came and you would just take a spoon and just take out big chunks of it. You would get the meat and the mashed potatoes and just plunk it down on your plate, and then you would just go off and you felt like you were in, ah, medieval times and you would just go through this stuff and it was so good. And it just filled you up because it was, like, super hearty peasant food. Now, the other thing that we loved, loved, loved for dessert. It was so simple. But we loved it. It was called Caramel Dumpling.

Carole

What is that? I’ve never heard of that at all.

Scott

Well, once again, it harkens back to my sweet tooth. If it didn’t have sugar, I didn’t like it. And, man, this stuff had sugar. So it was this once again in a 9 by 12 glass dish, you would mix into the bottom, you would mix in butter. There was definitely sugar and probably some water, and I’m sure a little bit of salt and you would just mix it all up, and then she made dumpling

Carole

Brown sugar or what?

Scott

No, no, no, no brown sugar. Everything was brown. Sugar

Carole

has not used white sugar. You use brown sugar in your cereal. 

Scott

You know I’m sure we used it for something, but brown sugar was the way to go…

Carole

To brush your teeth.

Scott

Exactly. She would make these dumplings and put the dumplings on top. So you’ve got all…

Carole

What’s a dumpling made out?off?

Scott

I don’t know magic, I think. Unicorns and magic. And then you would put the dumplings on top, throw it back into the oven so you could cook it with Shepherd’s Pie. Basically, it looked like two versions of Shepherd’s Pie. One was super sweet, which was the dessert, and then one was a Shepherd’s Pie. And, man, we love that thing.

Carole

Mom, Mom, can you make Shepherd’s Pie? And can you make Caramel Dumpling?

Scott

Oh, yeah, I don’t know why she has a low voice.

Carole

Your mom has a low voice?

Scott

 She was a baritone in the local opera!

Carole

As a bonus to the podcast will put the recipes for the Pickled Cucumbers and also for the Shepherd’s Pie so you’ll be able to take a look and enjoy it along with us. How about going out to eat? Scott, Where would you go? Well, you told me that you went out to eat at the Japanese Boy’s Chinese restaurant.

Scott

Oh, yeah. I used to work there for a while, actually. That’s why my Japanese is so good. Kon’nichiwa

Carole

My mother was a Chinese cooking teacher. She would teach on Tuesday nights at our house when I was growing up. For years, my sisters and I, we looked forward. So much to going out on Tuesday nights and we would go to Burger Chef, which was our version of Burger King or McDonald’s. I don’t know why we didn’t go to McDonald’s. I don’t even know if there was one close to our house. But Burger Chef was just a little bit down the road. And I loved my cheeseburger and French fries. Mmm mmm, mmm mmm. But I think in general, really, I think I like Asian food better. And that provides me more memories that helped me to recapture my childhood.

Scott

The next section we’re gonna get ourselves into we’re calling Minutia. This is information that will never, ever help you in life. Unless you get yourself on a game show, we’re going to get into the world of hot peppers. Back in 1912 a pharmacologist named Wilbur Scoville invented what’s called Scoville Heat Units, which is a measurement of Capsaicin. Capsaicin is the element in peppers that give it its heat. Pure Capsaicin is 15 to 16 million SHU, which are Scoville Heat Units. Now, I’m gonna break down some peppers shortly. But I wanted to give you guys an idea of temperature. How all this works. We’re gonna get to the top 10 hottest peppers in the world. But first, because I’m trying to think of, ah, system that we all can relate to, and I think we can all relate to Tabasco. I have a list of Tabasco’s here. Regular Tabasco is 700. I’m just gonna say 700 rather than Scoville Heat Units every single time I say this. So when I say a number, I’m referring to Scoville Heat Units. Tabasco green sauce, which is what I can barely handle, is 1000. Tabasco garlic is 1500. Tabasco chipotle is 2500. Tabasco pepper sauce is 3500 and then Tabasco habanero sauce is 8000 and then to break it down an actual peppers. A bell pepper is between zero and 100. Paprika is 250 to 1000. A poblano pepper is 1000 to 2000. Jalapeno peppers are 2500 to 8000. Serrano peppers or 5000 and 23,000 and cayenne pepper. 30,000 to 50,000. Now, people, this is when it gets serious. I have in front of me a list of the top 10 hottest peppers in the world. Number 10 coming in at 500,000 is the Red Savannah Habanero. Number 9, and I’m gonna qualify this. These next couple peppers are called 7 Pot Peppers, and they’re called 7 Pot Peppers because there, named after their ability to heat up 7 pots of stew. Number 9 is one million, and it’s called a 7 Pot Red. The next one, which is number 8, is called 7 Pot Barrackpore, and that also has a 1,000,000 Scoville Heat Units. Now the next one, number 7 is called the Ghost Pepper. One million.

Carole

I’ve heard of that one before.

Scott

Yeah, It’s super famous Pepper, and a lot of people think it’s the hottest pepper in the world. It’s not not even close now. The next one is Number 6. It’s called the Nega Viper, and that comes at a 1.3 million. Number 5 is the Trinidad Scorpion Butch T, which is at 1.4 that was developed by a guy named Butch Taylor. And that’s out of Australia. The next one is once again, a 7  Pot, and it’s called the 7 Pot Primo that is at 1.4 million. Now we’re getting down to the top 3, 7 Pot Douglah, and that is 1.8. And then number 2 is the Trinidad Moruga  Scorpion at 2 million. The number 1 pepper that is 200 times hotter than a jalapeno pepper is… drum roll, please, Carole… Carolina Reaper. And that is 2.2 million Scoville Units Hot. Ladies and gentlemen, that would suck the life out of you.

Carole

Could you imagine when Scoville started doing this research, he would have these trials and he had asked for people to volunteer to come and try, like how how on earth would they figure out what the Scoville Units were. Just try that. Try this peper. See what you think. Is it how hot the person gets their color of the face, The smoke that comes out of their ears.

Scott

If they’re still alive. All right, now that brings us up to ah, little thing that I just want to point out here. What do you do if you go into a restaurant and the dish is too spicy or if you’re cooking at home and you taste it and it gets a little too spicy? Things that you can do to add to the dish to help. Just take the edge off is to add some acid to it with maybe put some tomato, tomato paste, tomato sauce in. You could add veggies. Nuts are a really good way to knock some of that heat out. They use a lot of nuts and Thai Cuisine.

Carole

 These air really interesting because I’ve only heard of one type of method to make it less spicy.

Scott

Another thing you can add is sweet. I would love that because, you know, I’ve got my sweet tooth happening. Brown sugar brown sugar is the way to go so you can put some sugar in your dish. The other thing is you can put some broth, and obviously you’re just watering it down. And then finally, I think Carole was alluding to dairy.

Carole

Don’t they always say that you drink some milk with it?

Scott

I think so. Or just smother your lips with yogurt cream.

Carole

Maybe that’s why they have yogurt and Indian food that they always have, like a side dish of yogurt.

Scott

I believe so. The next segment. We’re coming to our pro tips for taking great photographs. And how can you exist in this instagram world without taking photos of yourself or other human beings? One thing that happens is people go out and spend a bunch of money on a beautiful camera, and they leave it in the automatic mode. So you just pointed at something – click take a picture, but you don’t really know how to change things around if the light is changing? There’s a lot of variation that can happen to the light coming into the camera, but if you’ve got it on auto mode, you might not be utilizing the camera that you just spent thousands of dollars on. The idea that I’m getting at here is I’m trying to move you guys from the auto world to the manual world. What I suggest is take the photo in auto mode and then write down the settings that you have for the shutter for the aperture and for the I S O then switch over to the manual mode than plugging all the savings from the auto mode into the manual mode. And then you can just play. You’ve got a starting point. So, you know, if you press the button, you’re gonna get pretty much what you got in the auto mode. But now you guys are playing in the world of manual mode and the cost to take a picture and find out what something does in the manual mode is absolutely zero back in the day when we were playing around with cameras, if you took a bad picture, it would cost you in the actual film cost and the developing cost. Nowadays, it’s so awesome. So I highly recommend you get yourself into manual mode and just turn the buttons. Just make it one click one way one click the other way. Take the picture, see what it does. See how you like it. See how the light changes. You’ll be taking awesome pictures.

Carole

So can I ask a question? Because, sure, I’m kind of scared to use manual mode, because for me, it just seems simpler that the camera will automatically focus using all of the light. And as long as I focus on the item that it’ll come out fine. What is it that in manual mode makes it better than being an automatic mode?

Scott

 Well, automatic mode can cover so many different situations, but there are times where you just need to tweak it. Maybe it’s a little bit too light for you. Maybe Auto Mode is looking at the whole picture, and it’s just giving you a little bit too much light because what you’re looking at is too dark. So it compensates and gives you a little bit more light so you can’t make any adjustments on it because the camera is doing all the computations on it, which, I mean in today’s cameras, does a really good job. I’m not talking about those situations. I’m talking about situations where the light gets a little gnarly. It’s still beautiful light, but you need to try and learn what it does in manual mode so you can compensate yourself. And then that’s what separates photographers is their choice of how they manipulate the light.

Carole

Okay, well, I’m excited. I’d love to try that. I want at least I have you to help me. Yeah. Yeah. Scott, I think we’re coming to the end of the show. Thank you to everyone for listening. We really want to hear from you, so make sure you take advantage of our call in number again. It’s 562 291-6037 and post on our Facebook page. Also, you can connect with us at our home base of www.ThisIsYu.com Or

Scott

if you’d like to come over to instagram, we’d love to have you visit and make friends with us. And we’d like to make friends with you on Instagram we are @ThisIsYuOfficial Once again, Yu is spelled YU.

Carole

You can search. This Is Yu Podcast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you find your podcasts!

Scott

Don’t forget to tell your friends all about our podcast Guys, we really appreciate it. We are a new and growing podcast. Please subscribe. Comment. We love hearing your comments. And also, while you’re on apple podcasts, why not rate the show?

Carole

5. 5. 5.

Scott

Well Carole, I’d like to say goodbye to you.

Carole

Okay. Scott, thank you so much. I’m really happy to get to do this with you. We have a lot of fun behind all of the arguing, but that’s okay. You guys don’t see that. 

Scott

I’m just gonna put Carole’s nose back in her head. There we go. And thank you guys so much for listening. We really appreciate it. Have a great week.

Carole

You calling me Pinocchio?

Scott

Yes. To your face.

Carole

I’m gonna hit you with my nose.

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