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Ep# 7 – This Is Yu – Wildcrafter Pascal Baudar


Ep # 7 – This Is Yu – Wildcrafter Pascal Baudar TRANSCRIPTION a Little Further Down Page.

Guys, in this Ep 7 – This Is Yu – Wildcrafter Pascal Baudar. We packed it full of vitamins and minerals! We get to interview someone we’ve had on our radar for 7 years! Wildcrafter Pascal Baudar! Not sure what a Wildcrafter is? Have a listen.

Pascal Baudar is a writer, naturalist and a self-styled “culinary alchemist” based in Los Angeles. His passion is to study wild edibles and research new culinary uses through ancient and traditional methods of food preservation as well as contemporary cooking techniques. In 2014, he was named one of the 25 most influential tastemakers in L.A. by Los Angeles magazine and In 2017, as offering one of the most innovative culinary classes.
He has served as a wild food consultant for several TV shows including MasterChef and Top Chef Duels. He has been featured in numerous TV shows and publications, including Time magazine, the Los Angeles Times, L.A. Weekly, and the New York Times.
Pascal has written three books: The New Wildcrafted Cuisine, The Wildcrafting Brewer and Wildcrafted Fermentation. The 1st two books became Amazon bestsellers in several categories.
On his inspiring website www.UrbanOutDoorSkills.com you will find a buffet of classes and workshops.
PLUS we have 2 new segments:

Carole’s – The Color Purple. Find out why Purple foods are so good for you.

And in today’s Sip Of Coffee, I break down the color of coffee beans!

Fan favorite Worth The Spend is back!!! Call with your questions, that are burning a hole in your soul. Our This Is Yu Question hotline 562.291.6037
Homebase is www.ThisIsYu.com
Instagram is @ThisIsYuOffical
Facebook Vip Group – Facebook and search This Is Yu VIP Community
#opinel#forager#foragervest#foragers#foragerchef#foragerbrewery#wildcrafter#wildcrafters#wildcraftergirl#altrarunning#pascalbaudar#coffee#coffeelover#coffeetime#coffeelovers#coffeebean#colorpurple#purplefood#purplehair#purplefoodie1d

Watch our interview with Forager Pascal Baudar!

START TRANSCRIPTION NOW:

Carole

Recording.

Scott

Red is for recording.

Carole

Recording.

Scott

Hey, guys, Welcome to Episode # 7 of This Is Yu. I am Scott Stewart

Carole

and I’m Carole Yu.

Scott

In this episode, we’re going to get to some really awesome stuff, the first of which is a interview with a local Los Angeles forager, Pascal Baudar. Hey, look, that’s his book right in front of us. He’s actually written three different books. The book we have is the New Wild Crafted Cuisine. It’s amazing. We’ve just got it and we’ve just got into it. We have him coming up shortly in an interview. Also on this episode, Carole has this new segment called the Color Purple.

Carole

I’m gonna talk to you about why I love purple so much.

Scott

We have another new segment called Sip of Coffee, which I’m going to do. And I’m super excited because I’m full of caffeine, caffeine,

Carole

caffeine, yum, yum!

Scott

And one of the fan favorites today

Carole

Worth The Spend.

Scott

It’s gonna tie in with forging. I want to give a little bit of back story on this episode how we’ve come to have our very special guest today, Pascal, when I grew up in Markham, just outside of Toronto. We lived right beside a river like it was a small creek going through and there was a little valley and we used to go down there and play, and it was really amazing because there was all this wild food growing there. And as kids, I mean, we took advantage of it. It was just sort of there. We had four different apple trees growing right beside her house. And then there was these bushes with these red berries on them, and all the neighbors were like, don’t eat those berries, they’re poisonous. And I always thought my head is kind of weird because the birds would just chow on them. And how could birds eat them and then we not eat them. But the wise neighbors were like, Oh, they have special stomachs and they can eat it and just do kids don’t eat it. But as it turned out over the years, I found the bushes to be red currents. We started just gorging on those red currents and they were so good.

Carole

What did they taste like? I’ve never had a red current.

Scott

They taste a lot like black currents, only red okay? ( laughing ) Yeah, exactly. like that. And then a little farther down in the ravine, there was a patch of wild rhubarb, and I used to go down there with a cup of brown sugar, bust off some rhubarb stick it in the sugar, and my mouth would just be crazy with sugar and sourness. That was before Sour Patch kids. We also had raspberries and tiny strawberries. There was a chestnut tree in the neighborhood, and up at our cottage we had Blueberry Hill and there was wild, wild blueberries up there and you would just go and pick them. They were small. We were small kids. So didn’t take that much to fill us up. Yeah, it was really awesome. And then, just north of us at this place, called Bruce’s Mill. We had maple syrup in the winter, and I went there a couple of years ago with my family. It was awesome because they distill all the syrup from the trees they tap out the trees, distill it down to bottles, which you can purchase. And then we went up in order pancakes with fresh maple syrup on, and it was so good you got lots of vitamins and minerals out of that. And there was also tons of cat tails around, which is also edible. Couple years ago, we went to a restaurant in Beverly Hills, actually with Dara, and Elena went.

Carole

It was called Red Medicine, the chef at the time. His name is Jordan Kahn. He’s known for very unusual foods. Really gorgeous, very beautifully plated it. It was a lot of foraged products. So Scott, what did it taste like?

Scott

It ruined me for the rest of my life because every flavor after that seems kind of like like a 75% because the flavors were so amazing. They were so vivid. It was like someone took the saturation in photoshop and just moved it up to 100. That really started getting the ball rolling for me, and I started to explore. And we also watched an episode on a Chef’s Table from the chef from Noma,

Carole

right, Rene Redzepi, who does a lot of foraging in Copenhagen, where he lives.

Scott

That also just brought an element of this forging into our view. And at the time we were doing the Dara the Bow Girl show, I actually did some research in Los Angeles about forging. We came up with Pascal years later. We’ve always kind of had it in the back of our minds that we’d love to connect with him somehow. And today is our lucky day.

Carole

Yeah, exactly. I remember you would just keep talking about that. Over the last four years, you’ve probably mentioned him maybe eight times. So I am really excited that we’re going to be able to speak with him today.

Scott

Pascal Baudar is a writer, naturalist and a self styled culinary alchemist based here in Los Angeles. His passion is to study wild edibles and research new culinary uses through ancient and traditional methods of food preservation as well as contemporary cooking techniques.

Carole

In 2014 he was named one of the 25 most influential tastemakers in L. A by Los Angeles magazine and in 2017 as offering one of the most innovative culinary classes. He has served as a wild food consultant for several TV shows, including master chef and top chef duels. He has been featured in numerous TV shows and publications, including Time magazine, the Los Angeles Times, L. A Weekly and The New York Times. 

Scott

Pascal has written three books. The New Wild Crafted Cuisine, which we have here in front of us. We just got it the other day and are totally loving it. The Wild Crafting Brewer and Wild Crafted Fermentation. The 1st 2 books became Amazon Best sellers in several categories.

Carole

On his inspiring website, www.urbanoutdoorskills.com, you will find a buffet of classes and workshops.

Scott

Welcome to the podcast Pascal Great to have you here. We are so excited. We are in your one of your rooms here and just to give people a sense of where we are, we’re sitting in front of a cornucopia of plants in fermentation. It’s amazing.

Carole

Maybe Pascal can kind of explain what’s behind us.

Pascal

Behind me. I have the idealic that plants grains and seeds right over there, probably have 24 different vinegars going on. Wow! At the bottom of my feet behind me, there’s a bunch of beer brewing. I also have alot of  lacto fermentation. The dry material over there is dry plants, different plates. Wow! And then the fridge over there, is full of lacto fermented wild food.

Scott

It just keeps going. It just keeps going and this stuff grows, too. 

Pascal

In the old place that I had, I used to have 6 shelves. This space is smaller, so only have 3 shelves, but packed full. Really packed full.

Scott

We can see here. I know you have spoken about the difference between being a forager and what you call yourself, which is a culinary explorer and wild crafter. Can you explain the difference to our listeners?

Pascal

Okay, so a forager is basically somebody with my my definitions, somebody will basically going into the wild and pick up a wild plant, food. I call myself a Wildcrafter  because Wildcrafter has this little implication that you actually take care of the environment. So it’s not just taking is actually looking at the environment as being part of it as a whole, so sustainability is a big point.  And I call myself a culinary alchemist because I’m really going deep into trying to figure out what you can do with those food. Like different uses and stuff like that.

Scott

This is not so much a question, but an observation and a compliment. I noticed you use the word explore a lot in your materials, and I absolutely love that. And that’s what I connect with because to me it means that you have a curious mind. And I think ultimately that’s what has drawn me in and made me such a huge fan. There’s not really an answer for that. It’s just I wanted to get a compliment in there. At some point.

Carole

I wanted to tell you about my daughter. My daughter is an artist, and she lives out in Joshua Tree. So she runs high desert test sites and Sara Witt, who is a chef out in Joshua Tree. Back in 2016 she ran a program for six months called High Desert Test Kitchen, So what they did is they had a group of about 20 people. They would get together once a month, and they would use specific desert plants in all of their dishes, and it would be a potluck. They would talk about how to cook these unusual ingredients, and my daughter, Elena, told me that they often would have discussions about access and that the way that the plants are sourced and about common foraging areas, being over foraged. What are some of the foarging rules that should be followed?

Pascal

Foraging rules? Do you know it’s interesting? It’s kind of a long story for me. In the beginning, when I was foraging, I was really interested in to all the food. It didn’t really matter. But over time, that was, you know, when I started, I was pretty much a forager. But over time, having such a connection with nature, I started to really look at this issue of sustainability and how I can interact with nature. So I was looking at sustainability. And In the last three years, it became even more intense because I’ve become really pissed off at the amount off herbicides and chemicals. They are being sprayed mostly to kill a lot of the invasive plant in no native plant. Our urban expansion has pushed me probably five miles further then it used to be, and also the amount of trash it is showing up. For 15 years. I lost five miles. I started to look at that. I’m going like this is interesting because also the plants that are being sprayed with herbicide and it’s happening every day and I see that I mean, I see it. I even photographed them and and I even photographed the effect on native plant s too. But they really spraying all those plans that are invasive and all native and in the same time, this is 90% of what a forager will actually pick up 90% of the food that somebody that calls himself, a forger will be in Los Angeles. No native invasive. You come here in May, you look at the hills, they are completely yellow So it’s it’s all mustard. Yeah, we have 10 different kind of mustard. We are not going to do anything with it. Those are crops in different countries. Mediterranean mustard. Black mustard is crop in North Africa. Ah, used to be a crop in France. I’m looking at all the plants, all those pants. And the more the research, the more I find that it’s used to be a crop. It used to be hunter gatherer food. For example, this is 12, alot of grains, but here in Los Angeles and I kind of see that also in America we are going to take a look at it and go like, oh, it’s bad. And we are going to spray it with chemicals and pesticides. And then we do habitat restoration, that means are going to go over there, and we’re gonna take all those resources and throw them away. The biggest, this is what I’ve learned after 15 years is that the biggest food waste in Los Angeles is probably no native wild food. We’re not using it. You have hundreds of thousands of acres of edible plants that we choose on propose, to not use because they are quote unquote weeds. But there are not weeds in different countries. There are crops.

Carole

Because people don’t know about the ability to use those as food. And you have so many homeless people and people without meals that you could sustain some people.

Pascal

More than that. I mean, there was so much food that is around. It’s not funny, but again so far they are no positive solutions. It’s always a negative solution. It’s always spraying pesticides herbicides and throwing away the resource. And I’m coming there and I’m going like you know what? Why don’t we look at food as part of those solutions. I understand that not all the plants are edible, but even though those plants could be used to make bio fuel, could be used to make paper. Could be used to do all kind, different stuff. You know, I’m gonna stick to what I do. Other wise I’m going to go all over the place. But I’m really looking at this food thing and the wild food in relation to the environment. So I’m basically going like, you know what? Fudge sustainability. I want activity to be beneficial. Yeah, and that’s kind of my viewpoint. Like how can I take wild crafting in a way that’s actually helping the environment. It’s not even sustainable.

Scott

You’re taking the next step.

Pascal

You need to take the next step. Right now, most of it is this issue of, like, climate change and pollution and all this stuff. It cannot just think sustainability, you have to think like how can my actions be actually beneficial to the environment.

Carole

So is this a one man fight? Or are there many people, wild crafters and foragers across the country that are interested in this?

Pascal

There are people were interested in the concept. I don’t I don’t know if many people think that way. I just don’t know.

Scott

I mean just in general conversation with foodie people doesn’t really come up that much.

Pascal

Oh no, with foodie that’s never going to come up. I mean, even if you go to a regular restaurant if you think about it. 99% of the agriculture is actually no native food that is being grown where you used to have native plants. I mean, you go to the store, it’s I don’t know if there is any native food. Like native plant food. It’s all no native. You see, I mean, there’s so many questions because you can like, well, those are  okay. Because, no, it’s part of agriculture. If the mustard was you know planted, You know, and understanding is the fact that some plants also take over the environment. That’s a bit of in a different issue, but I’m interested by the plants the take over the environment because that I can do something about it. And that’s what I’m doing, a lot of research right now is taking those plans that nobody wants. And a lot of my job is actually to go back figuring out again what has been for gotten. Finding those old recipes on how to make beer and how to make wine with plants that, you know people don’t use anymore. But they used to be used, you know, 2,000, 1,000, 6,000 years ago.

Scott

That’s what I like about what you do. It’s really exciting, fun future forward.

Pascal

It’s fun. Yeah,

Carole

Looking backwards. But moving forwards.

Pascal

Well, I’ll give you an example. One of the most hated grass locally. Yeah, I think that  you people call Foxtail.

Carole

Right.

Pascal

Yeah, the one that sticks in your shoes. When we had the drought, I’m going like, this was a very challenging for me. And I’m going like, okay, my start researching more deeper what I can find. I started looking at grains. And I tell you, every time I will go in nature and find a grain that was big. And I would study it every time he was a hunter gatherer food mostly from Europe. The Foxtail which is Cheat Grass used to be grain that was collected 6000 years ago. They actually found some in caves in cashes in France, and it’s a beautiful grain when you cook it. It looks like red rice.

Carole

Oh, nice. You know, great. So interesting

Pascal

It took to me a while, so all this thing that people hate, going like Foxtail, it’s actually free food.

Carole

I need to have you come to our next door neighbor. Their whole yard is lined with Foxtails, come and help us. 

Pascal

There’s a bunch of bunch of plants called Foxtail and the one I’m talking about is actually worse then the one that’s called Cheat Grass. The other Foxtail is the Wild Barley.

Carole

Oh, it’s barley.

Pascal

It’s just a wild version of the barley

Carole

That would be good.

Scott

Yeah, Pascal has a website. It’s www.urbanoutdoorskills.com. He’s got a lot of fantastic classes and workshops on there. Question that I had was what kind of a person finds themselves at one of your classes or purchasing your book.

Pascal

Okay, so I do have foodies that they’re coming to my class. I want to say foodies because they are people who are into food and they know, they actually know that if they come to my class, they are going to taste unusual food.  So the way I do it is we usually do a walk and then at the end of the classroom, like this big table that we all put together, I like a prepare all of the food.

Scott

I’ve seen pictures of that and it is amazing!!!

Pascal

It’s like tapas style, you know, simple tapas style and then the other people will come in are mostly people who love nature and hikers. If you think about it, you know, those people live in the city, living in the city. It’s quite complex. You have to use your phone and you can order Uber and you have to read all the signs, and it’s quite complex living in the city. But you go back in nature to work. And then that’s when I realized they don’t know anything.

Carole

They walk and they see green, and that’s all they see.

Pascal

And this is really backward. If you go back like four or five generation people would have known at most of the plants that were growing in the hills.

Scott

Even the kids knew it.

Pascal

Even the kids, you know. I mean, my grandma this is why I started with wild food. My grandma teaching me when I was a kid. So the older generation, they know this stuff. But young people, they don’t know it any more,

Scott

You know what I’m thinking? I’m thinking that you make a video game called the Forager. It’ll be a big hit. It’ll make you successful. The kids will worship you.

Pascal

That’s a lot of 3D to do!

Scott

Yes!

Carole

Well, so you said your grandma she introduced you to this. Was there any kind of food when you were a child that you… were you a picky eater of the food that you didn’t like to eat?

Pascal

No, it was very interesting. So I grew up in a small town in Belgium. Like maybe like 1000 people. Everything very boring. My neighbor was a cow. I will go see the cow in the morning. Like how you doing? ( Moo sound ) Conversations were kind of one sided, but we were without knowing that we were actually super sustainable. Ah, we had a big garden. We were raising rabbits who are raising chicken. My grandma used to send me all the time going, go get some dandelion and hazelnut, walnuts. Well, all this stuff because it was normal. Like the relationship that people had with nature was very different. Like going to nature to pick up stuff for my grandma was as normal as going to the store, type of thing.

Scott

And the good thing about that was your store was always open. Never closed!

Pascal

That’s right. Yeah. And there was always something. Yeah, you know…

Scott

It came new and fresh.

Pascal

Totally. I don’t recall as a kid ever going to the supermarket.

Carole

Wow, uh, self sustaining

Pascal

I didn’t think about it at the time, but we we must have been self sustaining quite well.

Carole

So how often do you go to the grocery store now?

Pascal

Well, I still, you know my food is really a mix if you think about it. Probably like every two days. I’m not an extremist actually I could live on wild food. It’s true. But a lot of the photos that you see that I put online on social media is actually the food I do for my class on Sunday. So they get it, and I don’t

Carole

Oh, I see.

Pascal

So my food is actually like a regular. I eat organic. And I would say wild food, maybe, like, 20% of my diet.

Carole

So you told me that you prepare these meals through the week. So what is your schedule During the week? 

Pascal

I have a list like today. I was experimenting with a new dish. I was doing some soda around so that I picked it up this morning. And now I just made before you guys arrived. So right now I’m just looking at the schedule. I’m going like, Okay, I got six days, now, and if I do a soda it’s going to take me that much to have the soda ready. Tomorrow, I’m gonna go foraging for black mustard. Going to try playing around with simple recipes.  Because I really want people to use those. This one, actually, maybe a little bit more complex. I want to a curry. I’m starting  to take a look at like really simple recipes. I’m not too extreme on some of those food. I mean, I can be very extreme, but I want people to look at it and go. I can do that, because I want people to use them. I will still do the recipe that are more what I would call that intense, in sense that I’m not, you know, when I look at wild food I’m not trying to use a recipe that already exists like a curry. For example, if I look at Nettle. I’m not that interested to make a pesto. Everyone’s like, oh, let’s make a pesto. And I’m really looking at the plant and I’m pretty much in my head going like asking the plant like, What do you want to be…

Scott

when you grow up? 

Pascal

What do you want to be when you grow up? What do you want to be before you go to my stomach But this is why I also use a lot of the lacto fermentation and the different methods of food preservation and yeast and and all this stuff is really starting to play with the plant and see what’s happening in what direction it can take me. And sometimes, one plant I will play with it for two years.  And then out of the two years, I may have seven or eight different recipe that I like and maybe 20 that were really gross..

Carole

So do you have any culinary background? How did you learn to cook? And how did you learn to experiment like this?

Pascal

Okay, so no culinary experience whatsoever. However, my Dad and my Mom were incredible cooks, like, incredible. That country cooking all this stuff.

Scott

So you had a good palate.

Pascal

I think got a really good palate. And I got to experience a lot of very interesting food, snails to smoked salmon. And my dad used to make a lot of pate and so really country.

Carole

That’s sounds amazing.

Pascal

And to be honest, like when I started to deal with wild food it was in 1999 I became interested again with wild food, and I did some classes. I probably did 400 classes, survivalists…

Scott

A lot of knowledge.

Pascal

It’s a lot of knowledge. I did that for two or three years. Every weekend. Saturday, Sunday, sometimes during the week, anybody will teach me native people, survivalist, botanists, I would even go to a store, stay close to the olives and when somebody was picking up olives I was like, please take me home, show me how. Make those olives. And I became fascinated with food  preservation techniques. So it was a long world. I mean, from 1999. So it’s already like, 21 years ago, and I just tried to play with it and play with it and play with it. And I did the Master food preserve at University of California. So I can teach, I call it Modern Method Of Food Preservation. But I really became fascinated with the traditional method of food preservation. And it’s probably like 30 of them that people kind of forgot. The reason I went into it is because, frankly, nobody else was doing it. I could have all those flavors and that is also dealing with chefs locally and playing with, you know, bringing them food. But nobody was really doing it. So I basically just say, you know what? You’re it! But in the same time, my cuisine became what I’m doing. So it’s a very much food preservation base. For example, you saw the table last week, I would say 80% of the ingredients are Food Preservation based. Like salted olives. Cure olives. Fermented mustard.

Scott

If you’re making this stuff, you’ve got to eat it. It’s gotta stay around for a period of time or you’re just wasting your time.

Pascal

Yes, so I basically I took all the only food preservation I was doing and then created a cuisine out off freshly foraged and food preservation and had fun. And somehow I created, kind of like my little niche, my little thing that only I do, because I do what I do!

Carole

Do you have a name for it.

Pascal

No, the Pascal Foodstuff!

Scott

Pascal method. And you can start doing exercises with it to combine every state. A whole body mind spirit. So I have a question for you. You have an exotic accent. You’ve said you’re from Belgium, but I’m gonna ask you a question that will prove to me once and for all that you are truly from Belgium. This is the question. Which actor is known as the muscles from Brussels?

Pascal

Jean Claude Van Damme

Scott

( Ding Ding Ding ) Ok and on to a more of a serious question. Who were the three people in your life that influenced you the most?

Pascal

Wow… well, my Mom and my Dad definitely. Christopher Nyerges is the first guy that I did the first class with, in 1999. And I remember going to his class, and within 15 minutes I had an epiphany and so I wanted to do with my life.  It was just teach locally teach more like survival skills.  But once he started teaching the wild food, I like an epiphany right there and then I said, this is what I want to do with my life.

Scott

Was just sort of like an alignment?

Pascal

It was an alignment of my goal. I really wanted to do that when I was a kid. And guess what? When my dad passed away three years ago, I found this old drawing of me. And it was called my life. And I was living in nature and eating the plants and this is all.

Carole

That’s amazing!

Pascal

I think a lot of kids actually know where exactly what they want to do when they are kids. And it gets lost because of all kinds of different reasons. But I think it was really in alignment. And it was like a big epiphany. Two people who came to my class, had the same epiphany, in the last seven years, and two of them are teaching. It just completely changed their lives.

Scott

There’s also an element of being a part of that. You were part of their life changing experience, which must have been pretty magical.

Pascal

Yeah, and I think it would happen to like a lot of artistic endeavors. Some people go to a concert,  and say I want to be a musician.

Scott

Sorry to interrupt, but I wanted to be Britney Spears for years. You can see it. 

Pascal

Yeah, you know, I mean, I’m really an artist, have a background in fine art. And I view what I’m doing really as an art form. That’s kind of like the way I look at those plants, as a part of art. Nature is art. And when you create dishes, simple dishes, still art.

Scott

Sorry I just wanted to jump in there too. I do photography. The images in Pascal’s books are amazing. They’re beautiful. They’re congruent with the whole vibe of what he’s doing. His instagram is amazing. I really sort of tip my hat to you because I think that the photos you’ve captured are exactly what you’re doing!

Pascal

That’s because I have a big… you saw my photo studio!

Scott

Your huge photo studio and all the lighting. Yeah, he has thousands of dollars worth of high end lighting. You guys could never replicate that. I’m so jealous of his photo studio.

Pascal

You know what? I have actually, I just showed it to him I have 2 planks outside and on those two planks, this is where I take all my shots!

Scott

Yeah, I’m like, okay, where’s all the lighting? But he’s got it set up. Just perfect. The thing is, he’s a good photographer, so he knows what he’s doing with the lighting. You said you take it between 11am and 2pm during the day,

Pascal

Depending on the time of the year. Like during the summer. I can start doing it between nine and three, and after that, the sun becomes too strong. I have to time myself. Like today I did two dishes. And… yah, two dishes and I was done just before you guys arrived.

Carole

What is one common myth about foraging that you’d like to debunk that?  

Pascal

That it’s dangerous.  

Carole

Why do people say it’s dangerous? 

Pascal

Because they don’t know, the problem is like… one of the common questions I get is, did you have a poison yourself? Did you ever get sick? No. Why? Why would I get sick? You know you if you know something, you’re not gonna make mistakes. You go to the store, you look at the tomato. You’re like, Oh, it’s a tomato.

Scott

Yeah, you don’t all of a sudden eat a hand grenade!going.  

Pascal

Oh, my God. No. I mean, even with mushroom, I mean, the people I know that do mushroom, I’m mostly a plant guy. I do have only a few mushrooms, but even the mushroom people, they’re very careful. People that are making a mistake are…

Carole

Don’t know what they’re doing. 

Scott

I did read in your book that you do have a little bit of a disclaimer in there, which was great, where you say don’t ingest anything unless you’re 100% not 40, not 60, not 80, but 100% sure.

Pascal

Yeah. And sometimes, like when I was studying mushroom sometime, it took me three years before I dare to eat that mushroom. And I would not do it until, like, three people that I completely trust. That are really expert that I really know. And I’m there in front of them with the mushroom. Then I would be okay to eat it, so I’m super safe. Super careful. But I did get sick three times in the last two years from food I bought at the store. This is more dangerous. I’m actually more scared.

Carole

You were scared of shopping at the market.

Pascal

Actually like two weeks ago, I got some kind of E. Coli or whether, I went to downtown Los Angeles and got so sick for two three days.

Carole

We won’t name any names.

Pascal

I don’t name names, but yeah, I’m actually scared to go to a store and buy food, too.

Scott

What’s something people seem to misunderstand about you? I

Pascal

I never fought off that.

Carole

Yeah, he’s I think you’re very secure in who you are, so I don’t think he doesn’t have to think about what other people think of him.

Pascal

I mean, I really base what I do on my own passion, but also ethics and morals and I mean, you always have, like, extremists, environmentalists will probably don’t like me much. You know some people have the conception that we should not touch nature anymore. Yeah, well, there a few in Los Angeles, like foraging a super bad. And they always give you the example, like, look at what’s happening here is ramps. You know, people look at what’s happening with fiddleheads and what’s happening with white fur, and they think this is foraging. It’s not foraging, the people who actually go pick up those plants. They don’t know anything else but those plants. Just wanna pick it up to make a profit.

Scott

So they’re taking all of it.

Pascal

Oh, yeah. There’s no ethics there they just want to take everything. And on top of it, now I’m really going for the invasive, and no native. So, I’m sleeping well.

Scott

What kind of changes have you noticed? Once you started consuming foraged meals like physical changes that happen to you?

Pascal

I lost weight. You know, I got… most of my changes were not physical. They were actually more… I would say spiritual. Having that connection back to nature really made me more calm, centered, more in harmony with the world around me.

Scott

Yeah. Greater awareness of…

Pascal

Yeah, you get all this stuff. This is interesting, it’s like , it’s in your DNA? And by going back foraging or wild crafting, you get back this connection with nature that a lot of people are longing for. They don’t even know sometimes they are longing for it!

Scott

Kind of woke you up to something that was already inside you and that you had when you were a young boy with your grandmother.

Pascal

I was really away from it. I mean, I told you when we were talking earlier, I was doing virtual reality. I mean, so far could be… 180. And I was doing okay, but really from me. Ah, there’s something spiritual about nature.

Scott

Yeah, Yeah, I I totally agree.

Carole

So I find it. I don’t know if the word is ironic, but it’s interesting that you live in a major metropolis,

Pascal

But I’m outside. I mean, if you drive over there, you see people on horses. It doesn’t look like Los Angeles. But on the good side to this is interesting, because here am I living in Los Angeles and I teach wild crafting. A lot of people are looking at that thing and go like, wow…

Carole

You can do it here.

Pascal

You can do it here. If you can do it here, you can do it anywhere! But in the same time, you get those issues that I’m looking at, and I’m going this big city, people are not connected to the land. And you have all these food waste going on and you have all the herbicide. It’s not going to continue that way. I mean, we are losing so much amount due to pollution and herbicides and pesticides and all this good stuff, it’s not gonna last forever, I can tell you that because I’ve seen it just in 15 years.

Carole

Let me ask you because you are outside of the main downtown Los Angeles, but you still live in the valley, which is an area that probably keeps some of the pollution in. Do you think that the items that you forage are affected by the pollution?

Scott

Because I think we’re speaking a little bit earlier about pesticides. They don’t like the water table. And you said how you got pushed. Five miles? I think so. It is definitely happening. Yeah,

Pascal

Yeah. But also, you know, I do a lot, most of my foraging is actually done, you know on private property. And they are away. Like I have two friends with private property in the Angeles Forest, so I’m away from civilization, it’s like, 20 minutes.  I also do my foraging… the is a girl in the in the mountains, Gloria Putnam. www.AngelesCrestCreamery.com Maybe you know her. And she has a goat from and she’s got Pinyon Pines and White Fur . This is where I get my stuff. So I played by the rules. You’re not supposed to pick up plants. You know, they’re the rules against foraging by the way…

Carole

Like in the Santa Monica Mountains.  

Pascal

Yeah, you’re not supposed to pick up plants in Angeles Forest is kind of the rule. In Ojai, they allow you to pick up what I heard from my friend that allow him to pick up for his own personal use on BLM ( Bureau Of Land Management ) land, you can pick up stuff for your own personal use, so I follow the rule. But this is where I break the rule. If I am going to the forest and I see a black mustard or mustard, some of those very invasive plants. You know what? I’m going to remove it. And I’m going to eat it. Why not? You know, this is more in harmony with the land, but I’m more in harmony with the land by doing so than leaving it there, for God’s sake.  Well, you have to think with it, you know. Play by the rules!

Scott

And like you said, you’re one person doing that. It’s not like you’re doing it commercially with a big combine in the mountains.

Pascal

Totally. And to be honest, like again in 15 years of foraging, I don’t recall..ya, twice, two groups foraging in 15 years. Nobody’s doing it. And the people were doing it where, it was a group of old Armenian people, like, 80 years old.  And were foraging for Curly Duck, which is a plant coming from… that you find over there. Invasive. And then I see two Korean grandmas picking up acorns, that said, it’s like that. It’s not an issue. There is no 99.99999% of the population in Los Angeles, doesn’t want to do anything with wild food, they won’t go to the market and have their job. And buy their food, really.  

Scott

Get it delivered by a drone.

Pascal

Yeah, totally. Yes. I like to walk, the world will come to me.

Scott

I don’t have to breathe fresh air in.

Carole

And the 0.00001 are foraging with you.

Pascal

Yeah. But in terms of pollution to go back to this, Um, I remember, like from my new book about fermentation. I was fermenting in seawater.

Carole

I’m sorry. What kind of water

Pascal

Fermenting, in seawater.

Carole

Seawater. 

Pascal

Seawater is the brand, if you think about it. I didn’t pick it up in Los Angeles. I went all the way to above San Francisco. I will not touch Sea Water below San Francisco,

Scott

Because it the currents…

Pascal

Pollution, all this stuff. I went over there and it was like pristine seawater. But the majority of people were like, what about radiation? What about plastic? And what about this? And what about that? Yeah, it was like such a controversy and I’m like people, it’s sea water. 

Scott

It’s a little salty.

Pascal

It’s a little salty is not like, you know. You eat fish, you eat seaweed. You ate all this…

Scott

Where do you think it’s coming from.  

Pascal

Exactly? It’s the same thing, sometimes people are like, oh, you live in L. A. – it’s polluted. We live on planet Earth. You do the best you can. I’m trying to collect plants in the best places that I know. And there is a point where I have to stop worrying. Otherwise, I’m never gonna eat anything. I mean, what you buy at the store is more polluted then whatever I will find in the forest. I can tell you that!

Carole

At least you know where it’s coming from!   

Pascal

I know where it’s coming from. I don’t have to round up on it. I don’t have the pesticides, or herbicides on it, you know which you will get in the market. 

Scott

Or GMOs.

Pascal

I’m getting better food that way anywhere. So you don’t have to be an extremist,

Pascal

Pascal

Carole

Pascal. What do you think are the greatest gifts that you’ve received from your foraging efforts?

Pascal

Greatest gifts? Peace of mind, stability, balance. Those are all spiritual gifts for me.

Carole

Are you a religious person in any way? Were you raised that way?

Pascal

Not really. It became natural. I would not even say religious, I would say spiritual. But I’m not looking for it .    

Scott

It’s was  a by product.  

Pascal

It’s a byproduct. It’s reconnecting with your own DNA,  reconnecting with nature. There’s something inside us. I mean, look at any, I would say like tribes or ancestral people living in the forest. There were always super spiritually. Spiritual, is a big deal. You know, I think it’s something that does happen by having that connection with nature. You understand that you are not disconnected, you are just  a part of it.

Scott

And you’re not trying to control it and overrun it.

Pascal

That’s correct. You just you know, that it’s just part, and you’re part of the chain and the whole the connection and and you start losing your ego, you start losing your thoughts about how great you are because really you are part of everything.  

Scott

There’s a humbleness to it.

Pascal

It makes you super humble. I think it does, you know, And and sometimes like, I get a lot of followers and all that. And sometimes it makes me a bit uncomfortable because it’s a different world. Like if someone comes to me, can I do a photo with you. I’m like, I’m okay on it, but it’s like such a weird thing for me because I’m such a I’m, like, really a normal guy. So I have a bit of a hard time getting admiration.

Carole

I think because so many people are surrounded by the city surrounded by stress, and they meet someone like you that’s very calm. And they can see that you have a peace within you and they want something of that I think.

Pascal

Maybe.  

Scott

If you could invite one person dead or alive for a foraged meal, who would it be? And what meal would you prepare?

Pascal

I will call my Dad.  

Scott

Very good.  

Pascal

I used to have a very, very strong connection with my Dad, but at the same time, we didn’t see each other for 15 years. Because he was in Belgium and I was here. 

Scott

But you still spoke through that period.

Pascal

We spoke. I used to put him to work like I would go like Dad, I’m doing a book about beer. Can you search, you know, on plants that were used in Belgium in the old days, and he will go crazy like, Oh, My God YES!

Scott

He’s like, can I taste some beer?

Pascal

So I would like to have a beer with him.  

Scott

Yeah, very good.  

Pascal

Actually, I went back to Belgium three years ago when he passed away, and he actually call me, and he’s like, I’m dying, type of a thing, and he actually died in my arms. I made it on time, so he was, I would not say he was sad. It was actually very close. Yeah, very deep. I’m happy managed to do it.. But I wish, you know, I could have the way my Dad was and have a Mugwort Beer with him, so he could actually, drink some of the beer that he was helping me figuring out! You know, what it was?

Scott

It’s good that some of his information has made it into your books.

Pascal

Yeah totally, I dedicate that book to him, actually.

Carole

Yeah, I think that experience must have been very interesting because so many people in Western civilization there so scared about death, I think with your connection to nature. It’s just a part of life.

Pascal

It is a part of life. You know, I think a lot of people are sacred. I don’t know. It’s interesting. I mean, I’ve twice in this lifetime, I’ve got really sick,  I thought I was dying. So, you know, it’s not something new to me like living with a possibility. So I don’t know. I think what I’m trying to say is my life is fulfilling enough, you know? And if there was something more, goody.

Carole

Is there one area in the world where you would love to go to forage,

Pascal

To forge? I’m  always attracted by North Africa. I don’t know why. And I have the feeling is because part of my DNA comes from there too. Some of my family came from Spain and probably Marrakesh. So if you look at my brother…

Carole

Totally different than you?

Pascal

Completely different. I mean, like American or whatever. Yeah, I think we have a little bit of history there. A longing for it. I don’t know why I probably will decide to go visit Morocco,  Algeria, those kind of countries a little bit. I love the music always. You know, when I was a kid, most of my friends were Moroccans and Algerians, it’s interesting.

Scott

Well, like you said, it’s in your DNA.

Pascal

I have defending their something there. 

Scott

Can’t run from that stuff. 

Pascal

Maybe, you can try. I don’t know.

Scott

What is one utensil that a forager can’t live without?

Pascal

Your knife, the Opinel knife! www.opinel-usa.com

Carole

Let’s see. What kind of knife is it?

Pascal

Opinel, Classic knife.

Scott

Don’t leave home without it

Carole

Opinel. And why is this one so good versus others?

Pascal

It’s a classic. It is.  

Scott

It’s French.  

Pascal

Very easy to sharpen. A lock right there. It’s used for cutting the little herbs. It’s very sharp. 

Scott

Good quality metal.

Pascal

Yeah, you can use it for mammals. You can use it for dinosaurs. There’s some for mushrooms, you know. It’s a classic. 

Carole

It’s a beautiful knife too!

Pascal

The should sponsor me.

Carole

They should. Okay, we’ll put that hashtag on there. How many times have you been stung by a bee or run into a wild animal while you have been foraging.

Pascal

Oh, many times. Yes. I mean stung by a bee twice. No, the bees are no big deal, but I’ve had a lot of encounters with Rattle Snakes. We do have Rattle Snakes. The close encounter was with a mountain lion, 6 feet in front of me.

Carole

Oh, my goodness.

Pascal

I was walking around. Then there was a duck. I had my camera, There was a duck sitting in the water, and I would keep moving, and he wood not move.

Scott

Wow, this is going to be a great picture.

Pascal

And I turned around and I hear this commotion, and this mountain lion is in mid-air trying to get the duck. Which means that when I was making that picture that Mountain Lion was right there.

Scott

And he’s like, thinking himself would that photographer get out of the way!!!

Pascal

I know the I mean, but you do all kinds of encounters in nature and bears or whatever. I’m more scared of meeting people in the store. Yeah, people are more dangerous.

Scott

What is the most beautiful thing in nature from your travels?

Pascal

The most beautiful thing in nature. I love the desert, but yet there is nothing to really forage there kind of. You know, it’s interesting. I mean, this would be more like toward native food, actually, and what I do is kind of the reverse.  I mean, I’m dealing with all the plant that nobody wants, type of thing. I’m actually foraging European and Middle Eastern plants. That’s really what I’m doing. And there is a little bit of native plants, but the native plants I plant them too. I have my own garden on private property.

Carole

So you say you have a garden?

Pascal

Yeah, actually I do. You know, I teach so I basically tell people I go for the invasive and non native and then plant the native, if you use them a lot. Why not? I mean, I’m really looking at how to make it beneficial. So what is more beneficial than even, like planting? And it came up naturally. It was not something that I said, well, actually, I plant native. No, it actually came from the relationship with nature. You know, If I pick up walnuts, why not plant the trees? You know, sometime I create my own little nursery. I planted like 4 or 5 walnut trees. I have white sage, black sage, California sage brush, California Bay,  mugwort. I mean, all those plants, that I plan to use, then I plant them. Yeah, so it’s really looking at again how to be beneficial. But it was not really this question I had in mind. My head like I have to be beneficial. It’s normal.

Scott

It’s just an extension of your give and take attitude. 

Scott

Yeah, you know, like, try to give more than you take!

Scott

And it all works out in the wash!

Pascal

And it’s all supposed to work out.  And you do make mistakes, and stuff like that. But, you know, at least trying your best.

Scott

Yeah, absolutely. I just want to point out, guys that Pascal has written three books. The one that we have is the New World Crafted Cuisine, which once again is amazing. Photos are beautiful. There’s so much knowledge that he drops in there. He also has The Wild Crafting Brewer and a new book that he has coming out called Wild Crafted Fermentation. Can you speak a little bit about that new book?

Pascal

The new book it’s actually this is the way it happened. So I wrote that first book and the first book was really a summary of what I’ve learned for, like seven years. And there was definitely some new concept for people in that one. Like doing the wild beers! You know, and how to make you vinegar from fruit flies.

Carole

Oh, wow!

Scott

That’s kind of a turn of the tables.

Pascal

That’s correct. People who make wine or  beer scared shitless of fruit flies is because they have bacteria in their body. Your wine sometimes turns into vinegar because fruit fly got into it, but you can reverse that and do it on purpose. And actually from that old recipe in a French book on how to make vinegar and from the 1400’s using the fruit flies and you make mead.

Scott

Ah, nice.

Pascal

And then you get the mother vinegar and once you get the mother vinegar you don’t need the vinegar with the fruit fly because it’s kind of gross anyway, but then you use the mother, and then you start infecting your wine with the mother. The fruit flies are just the bacteria. I also like to do a lot of lacto fermentation with wild plants.

Carole

What is lacto fermentation? Can you explain that?

Pascal

Sauerkraut, Kimchi. You know, in Europe you will make like sauerkraut. So you take cabbage, you add salt and the bacteria present on the cabbage will take over and create Lactic Acid. That’s what Sauerkraut is. And if you were from Korea, you will make Kimchi, which is exactly the same principle and then from all over the world, Russia and all the other is all kind of different, you know, project that people can do using lacto bacteria. But not the a lot of  people were doing fermentation. Lacto fermentation with wild plants. Plants from the brassica family are perfect. So that’s why you know, in Korea they use napa cabbage, for example. And in Europe, they will use like the green cabbage. But they’re all from the brassica family. Now think all the mustard that are invasive locally. They were from the brassica family. You can totally take those and ferment them. But from that book, the majority of people became interested by two things, so they became interested by the boozy concoction.Yeah. Come on. Beer, beer.

Scott

More. Now that you talk about that.  

Pascal

Yeah, that’s right. So you know, people were asking me so many questions, so actually I wrote a  book on it. And then also people also became interested, like you, by the lacto fermentation. So then I wrote a book about lacto fermentation. The reason I write books, you don’t make money from books by the way. I write books, you should know that, I figured I’d get, like, one dollar per book.

Scott

So that’s why you guys should go out right now and help him out. Get your book on Amazon. All of his books are available on Amazon

Pascal

Or from the publisher directly because they do help me. The publisher is Chelsea Green www.chelseagreen.com

Scott

I don’t think I mentioned it earlier, but his INSTAGRAM account is @PascalBaudar It’s @PascalBaudar. And once again, his website is www.Urban OutdoorSkills.com. Carole’s got one more question.

Carole

I do because earlier, before we started recording, you’re talking about a bus? What’s the bus?

Pascal

So have a project. I’m actually working right now of book number four and book number four, will really take a look at those invasive and non native plants that everybody look at them going like it’s a weed. It’s evil. It’s noxious bad, you know. You know, from my experience is pretty much like I mean, a lot of them are food. Like a lot. And I’m really looking at this. I’m going to work on the book that’s gonna look at the issue of pesticides and herbicides prey on those plants that are really food in different countries.  I’m gonna take a look at the issue of food waste. I mean, as I said, they were the biggest food waste in Los Angeles, probably is wild food, non native and invasive wild  food. So I want to take I would like to have a project and create a school on the bus and spent two years traveling here and there. Connect with foragers or like minded people. Chefs, too. And look at those plants that we really don’t want in the environment and turn them into food and try to look at a positive solution like food. Because, as I explained the a new positive solutions right now. It’s always chemicals and throwing away the resource. If 1% was used for food, I will be so happy even if it was 1% because that would be positive. And I think it’s important right now again within the context of climate change and all this stuff happening…

Scott

And people just having a greater awareness of this.

Pascal

Exactly and encouraging people to actually use those plants you know. So stop spraying them, for God’s sake.

Carole

I have one last question. So you’ve worked with a lot of chefs. What do they ask from you? What do they want and how do you help?

Pascal

I used to work with chefs. I stopped doing it, probably like  four years ago. It kind of started because of the restaurant Noma. Rene Redzepi, 10 years ago, I think became number one restaurant in world. Foraging was really hot. I decided to contact a few Chefs, that I wanted to work with. I told them who I was. And I took three restaurants and I was working with them. But he was interesting because I realized I was dealing with restaurants that were very specific, like I was dealing with a French restaurant and Italian restaurant,  Japanese restaurant. No, not Nicki ( Nicki Nakayama – Chef at Naka ). Niki was a bit different, like us, Much more exploring. So those people were not asking me for any interesting plants, they wanted on the good side is they really wanted all the invasive plants like, you know, if your French you want Dandelion. You want a black mustard, to make dijon mustard, you know, But there was no restaurant like Noma like there was not a restaurant in L.A. that went I want to study the flavor off the land, the Modern land. This is 2020. We have so many plants in nature that are edible, native and no native. There’s nobody going like, well, let’s do something with all this. So it was a bit boring for me. In the end, I actually stopped because it was losing the passion because, you know, it felt like I was a bit like just somebody collecting stuff. They we’re not really asking me any questions, like where does it come from? And Niki was the only chef will come with me in nature. I mean, the farmer’s market started to sell all the weeds that they had. Like selling Chickweed, Miner’s Lettuce, and Dandelion. The farmer said he made more money, selling my weeds product. And that was in 2014. Funny.

Scott

I think that brings us to the end. We are so grateful. It was wonderful to meet you. We’re just really appreciative of your time. Watch for Pascal. He’s got a lot of great things coming up in this upcoming year.

Carole

Thank you so much.  

Pascal

Thank you so much.

Carole

We really appreciate it. It’s been very inspiring!  

Scott

Carole. I think it’s time that we find all about the color Purple. What he got for us.

Carole

Well, the Color Purple was a movie back in 1985 with Oprah Winfrey. That was really amazing. But in this case, we’re not doing a movie review. We are doing a color review, you may know from the website from the podcast from the Instagram. My favorite color is purple.

Scott

It is…Oh, that’s right, Purple, right,

Carole

Right. You can even see in my hair in my glasses. My favorite jacket, everything. Purple is really rich. It’s complex. I love it because it’s a really eclectic color. It comes in a lot of diverse shades like lilac, mauve, violet, lavender and there are a ton of meanings that are tied to the color. And a lot of those meetings are very contradictory. For example, the ceremony robes of Roman emperors were associated with royalty, Henry the eighth. He banned everyone from wearing it except himself. Purple has also always been associated with penitence and with piety in religion, so you’ll see the pope will have a giant, beautiful purple robe. Another use of purple is that it’s a symbol of the LGBT Q X movement. I did not know that, but the reason is when you look at typical gender identified colors, pink represents the girls, and blue represents

Scott

the boys.

Carole

If you mix blue and pink together, you get lavender lavender blends together, the traditionally gender identified colors of pink and blue. It blurs the lines it subverts and challenges gender norms. Another way that purple is used. I love this one. There is a Purple Heart. Emoji What? Yeah. Have you seen it before? I have actually. The hardest uses, of course. Symbolized love, the emotion of love. Aw Ah! And a purple violet heart can symbolize a sensitive understanding and compassionate love just like ours.  

Scott

Oh, that’s so not true. I mean, it’s true.

Carole

Purple also represents duty, honor, royalty and good judgment. A symbol of honor for sacrifice. Ah, Purple Heart is awarded to U. S military veterans when they’re injured when they’re serving their country, this is something else. I just found out In 1950 there was a triangular blue drug invented as an obesity medication and an anti depressant. It had a street name called Purple Heart. And then, in 1982 it was discontinued. Ah, they fed it to housewives to help them with their anxiety and their weight. Eventually, people got too addicted to it. And then when they found another anti depressant, they then discontinued Purple Heart. Another thing that’s interesting is purple is so expensive and difficult to replicate. It was often associated with power and wealth and snobbery and extravagance because it was difficult to put purple into dyes for clothing for products that you would use at home for car paint. I guess there aren’t that many cars that are purple, but it is associated with power and wealth and snobbery and extravagance. Just think of purple rain and Prince.

Scott

( Singing ) Purple Rain…

Carole

The most interesting thing that I found in doing my research about the color purple is that purple is the least common color in nature. So, Scott, what are some purple vegetables and fruits that you can think of?

Scott

Um, I’m gonna take egg plant for 2000 Alex.

Carole

How about purple peppers, Purple carrots,

Scott

Grapes,  

Carole

Figs,

Scott

Figs? Did someone say Figs yet?

Carole

Elderberry,

Scott

Purple cabbage,  

Carole

Blackberries,  

Scott

( Singing ) Purple Rain…

Carole

Dried plums. I guess that’s about it anyway.  

Carole

Yeah, let’s do that for the next half hour.

Carole

So anyway, the reason that this is very interesting is because a lot of purple food and vegetables contain Phytonutrients. So Phytonutrients are naturally occurring compounds in plant foods. They’ve been shown to act as antioxidants, freeing free radicals and removing their power to create damage in the body. If you eat Berries like blueberries, elderberries and purple grapes, they protect yourselves from damage. They improve your memory function, and they promote healthy aging and fight against fungi.  So from now on, I am going to eat a lot of purple foods to match my purple hair. Hopefully, my skin does not turn purple.

Scott

Weren’t The Oompa Loompas? Purple?

Carole

Yeah, they were. That’s one of my favorite movies. ( Scott & Carole sing the song ).

Scott

Okay. Guess what, Carole. It’s time of four favorite new segment. It’s called Sip of Coffee.

Carole

Oh, sounds delicious.

Scott

Today we’re going to talk about roasting of the coffee bean. Have you guys ever wondered about the different colors of beans? Yeah, me too, right!!! Like you’re driving along. You think what’s with all the colors of coffee beans? Well  you are in the perfect spot, my friends, because I am here to answer those questions that keep rolling around in your head. There is drum roasting and hot air roasting. A chemical reaction inside the being occurs, causing it to become puffy, oily and tasty. Sort of sounds like my face as a teenager, minus the tasty part. Starches become sugars, acidity weakens and aromatic oils develop. Okay, let’s get into the colors here.

Carole

Okay. 

Scott

The green bean, which is unroasted at room temperature, will last up to two years. Next is the drying phase, 328 degrees Fahrenheit. It starts to yellow and enlarge at 380. What? are you saying about then en large? ( In Beavis and Butthead voice ). He said enlarge. A little Beavis and Butthead there for us. At 380 degrees Fahrenheit, we get cinnamon roast. This bean is yellow and the lightest drinkable bean. American roast at 410 degrees Fahrenheit happens right after the first crack.

Carole

What does that mean? Crack.

Scott

It’s actually win the being cracks At 410 degrees Fahrenheit, a crack happens. The first crack, and that is American roast. Moving right into the most popular US roast city roast, at 428 degrees Fahrenheit, this is a light brown bean. 440 degrees Fahrenheit brings us to full city roast with its rich, even color. Often it’s bittersweet. Next is Mozart’s favorite at 450 degrees Fahrenheit, Vienna roast with a light oil and a second crack, so the bean cracks again at 450 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a dark bean.

Carole

That’s really interesting, because do beans from all over the world react exactly the same. 

Scott

I’m going to say yes, because I didn’t research it beyond that. But excellent question to make me look like I don’t really know what I’m talking about. How much do we know about coffee? Other than what I just researched for this? Well, you do know because you live with me. Okay? Okay. Next is French Roast at 468 degrees Fahrenheit is starting to sweat a little oil and has a slightly burnt flavor. And then finally, for you, espresso lovers ( In an Italian accent ) Is a the Italian a roast at a 475 degrees Fahrenheit. It is a very a darker bean, a shiny with oil, and there you have it, Carole, Today’s Sip of Coffee.

Carole

Today’s Worth The Spend. We are tying it in with foraging because foraging is on your feet.

Scott

Definitely got to be on your feet out there in the wilderness. I just recently bought a pair of Ultra men’s Lone Peak 4.5 shoes in the color gray orange, and they were $125. www.altrarunning.com The reason I like these shoes and I started to explore this is as we come into this world as babies. We’ve never worn shoes. We’ve just been wrapped up in our mummy’s little tummy and our feet come out and they’re actually spread out. It’s only as you grow and your feet get put into shoes that they start squeezing together. Now I’m noticing some problems with my own feet with I’m getting a little bit of toe overlap on a couple of my toes, and I started to look into that. I’m thinking that’s not a good thing. And I don’t really wear tight shoes, and I don’t want it to be a problem, later down. This company that I’m speaking of  A L T R A. And they’re at www.altrarunning.com, they have a unique take on the shoe. What they do is make a larger toe box so your feet are open. Your toes can actually spread out every time you take a step. It allows your toes to relax and spread out naturally and the big toe to remain in a straight position for maximum stability and power. Now, the other great thing with these shoes is what they have is balanced cushioning. They call them zero drop. Every Altra shoe is built on a balanced cushioning platform that positions the heal in the forefoot at an equal distance from the ground. This natural foundation aids in optimal alignment, cultivates better form and encourages a low impact landing. When I first put the shoes on, it was kind of weird because it almost makes you feel like you’re falling backwards because there’s no heal on them. I mean, there is a heal, but it’s the same height all the way along the shoe, and I actually have worn them for a while now, and I’m really loving them. I use them for hiking, and I thought that they make an excellent shoe for foraging. And like I was saying, I used him for hiking and on the bottom. They have a lot of grip on them, and I’ve noticed it in my hiking. Every time you hit the ground, you really are able to push off better than just like a regular tennis shoe. For this whole package on my foot to make me happy romping around in the forest while I’m foraging things, I’m giving it a total Worth The Spend. ( Cash register sound )Well, that’s the show for today, guys. Thank you so much for listening. We really appreciate you guys And don’t forget, we love to have you call with any of your questions that are burning a hole in your soul? Our This Is Yu Question Hotline is 562.291.6037 Just leave a message with any and all of your questions???

Carole

Our home base is www.ThisIsYu.com spelled T h i s I s YU

Scott

If you’re feeling like you need a new neighbor on Instagram, we’d love to have you come over and visit with us so we can come and visit with you. On Instagram were @ThisIsYuOfficial

Carole

Our Facebook V i P group Go on Facebook and search This Is Yu V I P community where we join together and celebrate life ( Carole Laughing ) celebrate food.

Scott

Celebrate life sounds a little bit like Yes. Ah, He passed away on Thursday, but he celebrated life like no other man I know.

Carole

Here we will celebrate food and connection. It’s fun, you know, I guess we’re getting the hang of this. We still need a slogan, though.

Scott

Yeah, if you guys think of a slogan, please leave it on the hotline. 562.291.6037 Thanks for listening, guys. I’m Scott Stewart.

Carole

I’m Carole Yu. You see YU later!a

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